About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
year. >>> and the eu moves to clamp down on big paychecks in the banking sector, looking to cap bonuses on a banker's salary as early as next year. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. we're back. you're mobiled up and we have some data. >> yes. it's such a mobile world, isn't it, in many ways. let's first talk about what's happening with the german unemployment figures. we were waiting on these. it turns out 6.9%, that is the unemployment level for germany in january. the unadjusted figure is 7.4%. it's higher than expected. you can see the forecast was for 6.8%. the prior month was revised higher. the rate itself was unchanged. that's a right i think here in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contr
the uncertainty created by the u.k. e.u. referendum and scottish referendum on independence. there's a lot of negatives surrounding sterling now. i think it has further to fall. >> we'll leave it. there we want to get your thoughts on employment, as well. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." let's go straight to a look at what's happening with sterling. we have seen it drop below the 154 level. bank offen land minutes just -- of england minutes just showing fisher and miles would have liked to see a 25 billion pound increase in the size of the quantitative easing program. also comes as we learn that the u.k. unemployment rate held at 7.8%. slightly better than expected drop in jobless claims. average earnings growth remains weak. here's what's happening across the gilt curve. yields coming in at 2.4%. and james, at least the gilt yield is coming in. i suppose the markets would be most worried if the opposite happened, if it were to push out here. it's interesting to hear the bank of england say they think pound appreciation is expansionary. perhaps they look at th
nutrition, be well fed and a safe food supply. it is an honor to may pa*eu -- pay tribute to those at kansas state university, to make sure it remains a place of higher education and learning in our state, but also to make certain that kansas state university, manhattan, kansas, is always that place called home, where students from across our state and around the globe feel like they found a family and a place to learn and improve their lives and to make certain that they contribute to the betterment of our world. it's an honor to be here with one of the most distinguished alumnus of kansas state university, my colleague and friend, senator roberts, to wish that kansas state university many more years of success in providing education to our students and moving our state forward in ways that will only benefit not only this generation but those that follow us. so congratulations, can -- kansas state university. happy 150th birthday. mr. president, i yield back to the senator from kansas. mr. roberts: i thank my dear friend and colleague more specially for highlighting what k-state is all abou
because countries in the eu or even the euro zone are very, very different to what germany or portugal or greece or italy to the east, it's a very, very different situation, in that, that means we need also all a bit of time, education, infrastructure investment, all this is needed so that they have, let's say, a growth perspective for the next years. >> thank you. take another round of questions. >> [inaudible] >> the federal reserve hester medical increased its balance sheet since the great recession. about 20, 30 years, it didn't very all that much. suddenly very large increase. is the federal reserve comfortable in that it has an exit strategy so that we don't have either major inflation -- [inaudible] or major losses from purchasing assets and resale trying to bring back this money. thank you. >> a very quick to comment. [inaudible] i'm very happy to american colleagues. i think that we in europe -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> and in the back. did you have your hand up? >> that's what we do. any other questions? okay. is the one back you? >> i'm not an economist. i'm a
of the bulge names in part because of the eu risk is higher in those. how serious do you take a day like today on that front? >> well, our biggest concern really is the continued unstable nature of greece. i think spain and italy will be fine as long as greece doesn't create a chain reaction, which i think it will. and i'm still very concerned about what is going on there. but as you guys pointed out, you know, you came into early 10, early 11, early 12 and felt good, trends were good and the eu kind of put the kibosh on ceo confidence and capital markets activity. i'm concerned about that. >> you seem less worried. >> we're more worried about the u.s. economy. i think what we're seeing now in the marketplace makes sense. we had the megabanks lead the rally late last year. we recently have switched to the regional banks outperforming the megabanks and now we're getting that normal consolidation period which is to be expected. look at the ten-year treasury yield, that's what we say. if above ten for first quarter -- above 2% for first quarter, then earnings estimates will probably go higher. wh
. >> now we go into a full eu heads of state summit. it will be interesting to see if that theory about the euro gains further traction. >> let's roll out the red carpet and watch for the arrivals. thanks, simon. let's get to rick santelli in chicago, where we're still talking about your punch bowl this morning, rick. >>> i'll tell you what, it never ceases to amaze me where somebody like mr. rubin could say nobody could have nope, and yet the government singles out s&p. there's more to this story, or maybe there isn't. like i said, you can't fight city hall. one guy always fighting the battle keeping us informed about what may or may not be happening in europe is mark brand, southwest securities. mark, you were just listening to mr. draghi, and many of your comments, along with many traders on this floor, everyone was wondering when a big salvo to lower the value of the euro will be emanating from europe to keep up with the japanese. has that day arrived? >> no, the day hasn't arrived ye. i'll tell you what has arrived. the way the eu works with the 17 people and the 17 countries in th
sanctions is by legislation, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the table could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq we made them carefully. that got screwed up in oil for food, and i do not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders, especially if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where
some of the things necessary to live up to their commitment to the eu. does this throw a wrench into the works? >> i think we should be thinking about it. the somewhat untold story is that -- >> you heard of this guy before this? >> absolutely. >> was he funny. >> he's funny. it would be a little bit like -- >> jackie mason? >> no -- >> seinfeld. >> robin williams or somebody. he was big in the '80s this guy. he also has been a big part of the political satire, all the rest of it. very, very bright guy. but you know, it's almost an a listic party. it's july real just truly a protest vote. to my knowledge it's gotten over 25% of the vote, the latest thing i've seen. monti is the best of the best. i honestly believe that is one of the, you know, on democracies it's easier to give stuff away. >> two years ago he had just started and i asked why are these pictures of monti in a beach chair. and they all said send monti to the beach. that was two years ago. >> yeah, he's only been in there a group -- grillo is moving. five-star movement is only three years old. it's a very organized,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)